Police are offering a $1 million reward in a bid to solve the cold case murder of a woman in St Albans more than three decades ago.

Antje Jones, 34, was shot on September 15, 1981. Her body was found in her brother’s Theodore Street address about 3.20pm.

Police believe the gunman entered the house and shot Ms Jones, who was staying with her brother while visiting from Queensland.

Ms Jones had moved from Melbourne to Queensland to live with her parents and young son after divorcing her husband about a year earlier.

Police announced in 1982 a $50,000 reward for information to help solve Ms Jones’ murder, but no information came to light.

 

Antje Jones

Antje Jones was shot in St Albans in 1981. (Supplied)

Homicide Squad Detective Inspector Andrew Stamper said investigators believe the murder was targeted.

“It may have been 37 years since Antje was killed but our investigation never ceased,” he said.

“Over the years, we have followed up a number of avenues of inquiry and we now believe one of our key persons of interest in the case may have organised for Antje to be killed.

“Antje was in Melbourne appearing as a witness in a court case for a car crash from several years earlier and decided to stay longer and take the opportunity to catch up with family and friends.

“Instead of returning home to her little boy, Antje’s life ended violently in Melbourne.”

Detective Inspector Stamper said he was hopeful the $1 million reward would bring forward new information.

“We know there are people out there with information to help identify Antje’s killers,” he said.

“Thirty-seven years is a long time to keep a secret – people’s circumstances can change over the years and someone who may not have wanted to provide information to police previously may now feel ready to do so.

“We still believe this case is solvable and are committed to providing justice for Antje and her loved ones and bringing those responsible before the courts.”

Anyone with information about the murder is being urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 18000 333 000.