Kiran Aslam, a henna tattooing artist who lives in Tarneit, says she enjoys the creative expression her art form offers. The 27-year-old talks to Wyndham Star Weekly:

How long have you been doing henna tattooing as a profession?

For three to four years. Back in my country, Pakistan, I would do it for my friends and family, they really liked it. Then I moved here around 2.5 years ago, and I did it for my neighbours and Pakistani friends. They told a lot of their friends, and I had a lot of people come to me. Word of mouth spread and I made a Facebook page. More people saw it and they would contact me. Mostly I go to their places – for weddings, I’m with them all day and do henna tattoos for many of their guests. It also takes four to five hours to do it for a bride. I also do it for pregnant women, on their baby bump – it’s like a baby blessing, or for a baby shower. Mothers really love it, and so do I. I also do hen’s parties and birthdays, children’s birthdays as well – they often like to get a small design, like a flower.

How did you get started in the art form?

I started it as a hobby, because I really liked it. It takes a lot of practice to get good. Through doing it for my friends and family, myspeed at henna tattooing also became good.

What do you enjoy most about henna tattooing?

I like that if a design comes into my mind, I can draw it and be creative. I can be calm and forget what else is going on in my mind, while I do it. I also like to see people’s reaction to my artwork. That’s what I look forward to, it really makes me feel good.

There are some times of the year, which are important to different cultures or religions, when you become really busy?

Indians have Karva Chauth and Muslims have Eid, so I get really busy around then – there are many Hindus and Muslims in the area. In my neighbourhood, there are also many Africans, Somalis, do I often do black henna for them.

Do you mostly do henna tattooing for people from Wyndham or is there a demand for it right across Melbourne?

I find it’s from everywhere. I sometimes go to Frankston, to Dandenong and the city as well.

How long have you been doing henna tattooing as a profession? For three to four years. Back in my country, Pakistan, I would do it for my friends and family – they really liked it. Then I moved here around two and a half years ago, and I did it for my neighbours and Pakistani friends. They told a lot of their friends and I had a lot of people come to me.

Word of mouth spread and I made a Facebook page. More people saw it and they would contact me.

Mostly I go to their places. For weddings, I’m with them all day and do henna tattoos for many of their guests. It takes four to five hours to do it for a bride. I also do it for pregnant women, on their baby bump – it’s like a baby blessing – or for a baby shower. Mothers really love it, and so do I.

I also do hen’s parties and birthdays, children’s birthdays as well – they often like to get a small design, like a flower.

How did you get started in the art form?

I started it as a hobby, because I really liked it. It takes a lot of practice to get good. Through doing it for my friends and family, my speed at henna tattooing also became good.

What do you enjoy most about henna tattooing?

I like that if a design comes into my mind, I can draw it and be creative. I can be calm and forget what else is going on in my mind. I also like to see people’s reaction to my artwork. That’s what I look forward to – it really makes me feel good.

Are there times of the year, which are important to different cultures or religions, when you become really busy?

Indians have Karva Chauth and Muslims have Eid, so I get really busy around then – there are many Hindus and Muslims in the area.

Do you mostly do henna tattoos for Wyndham people or is there demand across Melbourne?

I find it’s from everywhere. I sometimes go to Frankston, to Dandenong and the city as well.