A majority of inner-west residents have thrown their support behind allowing same-sex couples to marry, joining a national push for change to the legal definition of marriage.

Results of the same-sex postal survey were released on Wednesday, showing 61.6 per cent of respondents in favour of change.

The overall Yes vote was almost 3 million ahead of the No vote – 7,817,247 to 4,873,987, after 8 out of 10 eligible Australians expressed their view.

All states and territories recorded a majority Yes response and only 17 of the 150 Federal Electoral Divisions recorded a majority No response.

Gellibrand voters were among the most supportive with more than twice the Yes vote to No – 62,045 (68.1%) compared to 29,065 (31.9%).

In Maribyrnong the Yes vote was just under 60 per cent – 53,208 (59.9%) to 35,658 (40.1%).

Mr Bailey and Akira of West Footscray proudly sport rainbow scarves acknowledging the positive outcome of the same-sex marriage postal survey result. Photo by Edwyne St Joseph

Mr Bailey and Akira of West Footscray proudly sport rainbow scarves acknowledging the positive outcome of the same-sex marriage postal survey result. Photo by Edwyne St Joseph

The local vote reflects the strong public display of support during the survey period.

Gellibrand MP Tim Watts said it took 7.8 million Australians to give Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull the backbone to stand up for LGBTI rights against the Conservatives who run his party.

“I feel relieved but angry that Turnbull inflicted this farce on Australia – especially on LGBTI Australians and their families.

“Now for Parliament to finally do its job.”

Maribyrnong MP and opposition leader Bill Shorten told a rally in Melbourne that the Australian people have declared overwhelmingly Australia is ready for marriage equality.

This marriage equality survey is not just good for marriage equality… Australians have voted for a modern Australia where diversity is accepted, supported and respected.”

Mr Shorten said same-sex marriage should be legalised as quickly as possible, ideally before Christmas.

“Today we celebrate, tomorrow we legislate,” he said.